Calculating board volume (for dummies)

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Michael_A's picture
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Hello gentlemen,

Can anyone suggest how to approximate board volume? I have a high-volume Lost Plank (6'0") and a Stretch Ratskate (6'3") as my bigger wave board ... would love to compare the volumes as they are so very different. My next board may be something in between. Short of finding a giant bathtub, any easy way to come up with some values?

Michael

resinhead's picture
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L x H x W = Cubic Volume


 


I gots me a caculator too!

t3d
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that formula can be only used for shapes such as a cube or rectangular prism.

resinhead's picture
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I know.....I'm such a dick!

Michael_A's picture
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Hmmm .... well .... I think I will see if anyone else replies before pulling out the ol' calculator!

jimithesaint's picture
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Try this:


You can calculate approx volume by:
1/2 length x width x thickness +(10x evry inch over 6')
You get a big number (cubic inches) that you divide by 60.02 to convert to liters.


 


taken from "Red" on KSUSA



Jim

GTFD's picture
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BoardCad or Shape3d lite has a volume read out feature as you input dimensions to picture a board

thirdshade's picture
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get a big bath of water, fill it to the brim, push board so it's completely immersed, catch water displaced and pour into measuring jug...would be more fun using beer...

resinhead's picture
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thirdshade wrote:


get a big bath of water, fill it to the brim, push board so it's completely immersed, catch water displaced and pour into measuring jug...would be more fun using beer...



 


Wait a minute....If my surfboard fits comfortably in a bath tub...then it aint no surfamabord...it's a pool toy. Go look at your bath tub and tell me your board fits in that? 

brian_cab's picture
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The water tank method is a great way to measure the volume and/or determine the bouyancy of a finished board.

Plonk the board into a draft tank, mark the water level and start piling weight on noting the change in level at specific weights until fully submerged.  A simple rectangular volume calculation provides the volume which when converted to cubic feet and multiplied by ~64#s per cubic foot gives you the displacement load.

To calculate the volume from take-offs or drawings of new designs or existing boards follow the link posted in this thread

http://www2.swaylocks.com/forums/surfboard-volume

Which will take you to a page on how to use Simpson's rule which will not be posted here because while easier than intgral calculus, the explanation is still a read longer than a simple post.

Simpson's rule is somewhat more accurate than the rectangle and trapezoidal rules in practical use for me - generally within 5%.

MikeDaniel's picture
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As noted, the easiest thing to do (for most people) is go to boardcad and draw your board as accurately as you can. You can get as detailed as you want - interval thickness and deck dome accuracy will get you a better #.

thirdshade's picture
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Hey Resinhead...it's all about the size of your bath...

ghettorat's picture
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Up until recently surfboard lovers placed more emphasis  on weight not volume, just like cereal or a bag of chips... Not to downplay it, but I think overall water displacement, of rider weight/volume, as well as, rider skill, age, and surf type lends more insight.  Nonetheless, not a bad thing to understand, but not something anyone penciled on an order form anywhere, so  I agree with you, its for dummies.

haavard's picture
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ghettorat wrote:

Up until recently surfboard lovers placed more emphasis  on weight not volume, just like cereal or a bag of chips... Not to downplay it, but I think overall water displacement, of rider weight/volume, as well as, rider skill, age, and surf type lends more insight.  Nonetheless, not a bad thing to understand, but not something anyone penciled on an order form anywhere, so  I agree with you, its for dummies.

Well, some scribble it not only on the order for but on the board as well.

http://www.diversesurf.com.au/boards/boards/volume2.php

MikeDaniel's picture
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I've been writing volume #s on boards since 2006, I think Dave started doing it in 2004. Others in the industry are starting to follow.

wouter's picture
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Mike,

rusty his site in 2012

still your cubic feet are quicker to compare...

more great boards please!

[img_assist|nid=1066609|title=volume|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=520|height=640]

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Hey fellow surfah/s, how do you like the 6'0 Lost Plank?  Anyone else out there have feedback on it?  I'm seriously considering getting one but nobody that ive seen yet in Hawaii has one and the shops that carry it out here are charging more than $100 (Shipping plus their mark up) over the web prices putting it over $800 after  and tax. Not willing to pay that if the board is just ok. Your input would be greatly appreciated towards helping me make a purchasing decision as it is a difficult choice considering the price but the look of the board is so sweet. Also looking at the Lost Motivator 6'0 as well. Need grovel boards that rip and work for a big guy not a big corky POS. Help Please........

pridmore's picture
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its good, I have always taken volume into consideration but only recently really writing it on boards and getting into it with customers, especially with team riders and regular repeat customers...good stuff....

Michael_A's picture
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Hi guys,

Original poster here after two years ... I found the easiest way to measure the volume of an existing board is to turn it on its side then use gym weights to sink it exactly half way (in other words, right down to the stringer). I did it in a pond once when I was bored and luckily no one else was around. If you add the weight of the board to that figure then double it, you have the volume. The 6' plank was 44kg = 44 liters.

Michael