Corner of the Tail Ding!

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RISurfer's picture
Joined: 04/26/2004

Just wondering if anyone could help me out. My board was tossed around in the wind the other day which resulted in a tail ding. The ding is on the right corner of the tail. Scrunched the foam in about 1/2". I sanded it down, but now I am wondering what to do next. Possibly use some cabosil? I think I need to create and build up that 1/2" which was lost. I don't think I can use all fiberglass to get the tail flush and straight plus have the same angle on each corner of the tail. Also, how shold I lap on the fiberglass without building up a layer on the tail? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Woody's picture
Joined: 03/25/2004

I just finished doing a similar repair. Placed masking tape around ding, then underneath the missing section. I then used Q-Cell and built up the missing section. Once dry sanded it to match then placed a coat of resin over it and sanded once again.

We have used this approach on a number of other dings in tough places with great results. Just make sure to go easy on the hardner, otherwise you will have a black smoking board. Hope this helps.

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kokua's picture
Joined: 03/18/2004

Howzit Woody, what about some fiberglass coverage. Aloha, Kokua

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Aloha, Kokua

ambrose's picture
Joined: 03/18/2004

yeah daddy with no glass the sil cabo or Q will come out in a chunk ...square tails are Chronic ding magnets ...ambrose ...fin sheet tailblock ...I did a corner for lenny foster's ukulele on one corner what a cool unexpected detail I loved doing that

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ambrose M. curry III

RISurfer's picture
Joined: 04/26/2004

Thanks guys for the help. I plan on using Q cell to fill in the missing area, cover with fiberglass and resin. Thanks again.

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rKelly's picture
Joined: 03/19/2004

I'm sure I take it farther than need be, but I enjoy it... I prefer to fix with foam. Again, It's probably overkill, but who cares.

Sand the whole ding out so it's flat. Grab a spare piece of foam that you saved from your cutouts - you do save your foam don't you? Cut it into the general shape, but a little bigger on all sides. Make sure it has a smooth flat side as well. Smear on some resin and push it together. I usually use a toothpick or small dowel to help hold it on. Tape it on as tight as you can. Come back in a couple of hours and HAND sand it into shape. Be careful, it's not very strong until you get that glass on there.

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doc's picture
doc
Joined: 03/18/2004

It was kinda breezy up here in New England, wasn't it. Like everybody else has said, fill and sand to shape... a few tricks of the trade:

Carefully separate the crushed foam from the glass and, as much as possible, push the crushed glass back into shape. An X-Acto knife is very good for this. Do Not start getting crazy with cutting stuff out - some of the horrors I've seen and then they want me to fix 'em - yeesh. Preserve as much of the original glass as possible, especially if you have airbrush color: it's the only way you're gonna match it up.

If you want to go with foam, providing you have some, cut away the minimal amount of old foam. I generally don't, 'cos I don't keep much foam around.

Now, make sure the board is bottom up and set so that the bottom right where the ding is is pretty nearly flat - use blocking and such to do that. Tape along the rail to make the bunged up glass and tape into a mold for your filler pour. If there's surviving glass on the bottom, good. You'll have to pry that up with your trusty X-Acto to pour in the filler, but that's okay.

Mix up a very lightly catalysed batch of sanding resin plus cabosil. As in maybe half what you'd use for straight resin. Use enough cabosil to get a heavy cream consistency, no thicker. Mix in cabosil to taste, then catalyst, not the other way around. Pour it in, then run your finger along the tape and tap it a few times to get the air bubbles out. Repeat until there's no air trapped and the pour is a little above the glass surface. When it has hardened, sand to shape, sand a little around the area too.

If your board is airbrushed, you'll have some filler-colored lines and such between the remaining original glass pieces. You need to decide whether or not that's acceptable as is or not. If it is ( being lousy at color matching, I generally figure that it's fine) , glass over it with 4 or 6 oz cloth. It's a good idea to use a diamond-shaped oversize piece, which you kinda warp and deform so it doesn't need to be cut and overlapped: with a little patience and some judiciously used masking tape you can do that.

Need color? Ok, find the RISD type nearby ( Rhode Island School of Design, a very good art school for all you non-New Englanders) and have her bring her watercolors to match the original color as close as possible by mixing watercolors and painting carefully on your lightly sanded filler. Then glass over it all ( careful with the resin on the watercolors) , sand the edges, carefully hotcoat/gloss and you're done.

hope that's of use

doc...............

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RISurfer's picture
Joined: 04/26/2004

Hey Doc. I believe I remember you from the old NEsurfclub email list, which you got sick of the bs and left. The list is just about the same. If you are the right person, I think you are from the Cape. Was wondering what ever happened to you. You used to share some good stories on the email list.
I was down at PT J, had my board lying on the grass just above the cliff, and a strong wind picked up and blew the board down the cliff. Kind of stupid mistake. All my dings happen out of the water! The airbrush isn't involved so that is a plus. This is my first tail ding, so this should be an experience. I plan on fixing the ding this weekend. Thank you for taking your time to write in detail, the process of fixing the ding. Hope your catching some waves up there.

Thanks again.
Rob

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doc's picture
doc
Joined: 03/18/2004

( laughter).....

Yeah, Rob, that's me, that's why and I'm not surprised it hasn't changed. A couple of people there...gah. On the other hand, some friends of mine are having some fun with 'em, wreaking subtle havoc on the unwary. Much better bunch here. I do the storytelling on alt.surfing these days.

Lets see.......

Yeah, I find that the vast majority of the dings I fix are just something happened out of the water. Good thing about the airbrush not being involved. I hate repairing those, you never really get it right no matter how you try.

A trick for warping the cloth around that corner: cut your strip, hold it to the deck side and then tweak the corners, working it along with your hands wrapped around the rails until the weave distorts and it wraps nicely. Then hold the corners in tension with a little tape, brush on resin with a chip brush and there you go. It'll be a little ugly at the edges but cut those neatly with a sharp blade and light pressure when the resin is barely gelling, feather sand the cloth lightly when it's hardened, mask it off and brush on a combined hotcoat/gloss and that'll pretty much have it.

this may help, it may not......

Tail dings are really no biggie except maybe swallowtails, which I'm beginning to think should be done with solid glass tips an inch deep. That's a repair that always comes back.

Swing in for a cold one if you're ever up thisaway

Best regards

doc................

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RISurfer's picture
Joined: 04/26/2004

Thanks for the help Doc, I appreciate it.

Rob

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doc's picture
doc
Joined: 03/18/2004

De nada, man, any time.

Now I'm thinking about Ambrose's fin-sheet tailblock idea on one of those cursed swallowtails, with mebbe a couple of chunks of dead Rainbow fin . It'd look cool too....

doc..............

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