Rail Ding on CI board help please!!!!

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singefin4me's picture
Joined: 04/18/2004

I am sorry to ask another gloss question, but i am stuck. I have so much trouble with small dings! I had a brand new CI board that i am fixing, it was a single fin and glossed really nice. THe ding is a rail ding and about 2 inches wide. I have fixed the ding fine but cannot get the gloss to come out. Any suggestions. I cant get it so that it needs no sanding and am trying to get it pretty close to the gloss on the board. I am wondering about paper grains, compound, anything to get it shiny. Any help is appreciated.

Mahalo

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doc's picture
doc
Joined: 03/18/2004

As long as it's hardened enough that it'll sand rather than smudging....

sand with 200, then 300, then 400, then 600 grit , all wet/dry sandpaper and plenty of water, polish it a little and you should be good to go. Sometimes it doesn't come out perfect when ya gloss it, so a little wet sanding then polishing is the way we make up for that.

hope that's of use

doc.........

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singefin4me's picture
Joined: 04/18/2004

so i am assuming the trick is sanding the edges down smooth and all before it hardens completely? That might have been it! Thanks alot!

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LeeDD's picture
Joined: 03/18/2004

I'd wait till the gloss coat sets up completely, then wait another 48 hours, then sand with 400/600/rubbing compound/polishing compound

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doc's picture
doc
Joined: 03/18/2004

Woops, no, like Lee says you want to wait until it's real hard before sanding. Otherwise, gummy mess time.

If you used thinned sanding resin for your gloss and masked around the area, one thing that sometimes helps me is to pull the tape when the gloss just starts to kick/harden. The edges kinda collapse a little, much less sanding will be needed. Also, work the brush some so you have as little resin as you can get away with right where it hits the masking tape, pull any excess resin up onto the tape so there's just a thin film of it on the board. That also helps the transition/sanding issue.

Hope that's of use

doc.................

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Fairmont's picture
Joined: 03/20/2004

Call me a smartass, but after you get that ding perfectly shiny, tell us how much better it rides.

Dings are good. They add character. Of course, the only noble dings are inflicted by rocks, since all the others make us look like an ass.

I venture to say that most dings happen in the garage or the damn car, maybe the parking lot. I can't remember the last ding I actually got in the water, but I get small ones about once per month just getting the board down out of the racks in my garage. Bang here, bang there, slap on a little Solarez or Sun Cure, sand it quickly, and go surfing. This aint no beauty contest.

Unless it's a Cooperfish. A Cooperfish is a whole different story. Holy smokes! Lots of guys make great shapes, but a Cooperfish belongs in the Smithsonian. Pure Art.

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singefin4me's picture
Joined: 04/18/2004

Quote:


Call me a smartass, but after you get that ding perfectly shiny, tell us how much better it rides.




I think you are missing my point. I was just asking for some help on a ding. And thank you to those who were helpful, i got it done and it looks great. As to what you were saying, i have had almost all of my dings in the water. Most people who push themselves, take the big drops, ride to the beach get dings in the water. That being said myself along with many others like to take care of their boards and when repair and shaping is a hobby why not do it right?

I have boards that are way better than any cooperfish youve seen!
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rKelly's picture
Joined: 03/19/2004

Really? ...for repairs I always go at it with 80 grit pretty soon after it kicks... not too soon or you just pull it off. But while it's still green, it seems easier to fade that edge down. Then I come back hours later, once it's hard, and finish the job.

If I wait it seems like I can never get rid of that line on the perimeter of the new resin??

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doc's picture
doc
Joined: 03/18/2004

Quote:


Really? ...for repairs I always go at it with 80 grit pretty soon after it kicks... not too soon or you just pull it off. But while it's still green, it seems easier to fade that edge down. Then I come back hours later, once it's hard, and finish the job.

If I wait it seems like I can never get rid of that line on the perimeter of the new resin??




Ah, I see, it's kinda like how brush marks fade and flatten in paint. Never thought of that, thanks.

doc..............
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