Troubles with hot coat on buckled nose repair

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pth's picture
pth
Joined: 01/30/2011
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I'm (finally) repairing a buckled nose on a board that I used to love, following directions / input I received from an old thread here. 

So far, everything seems to have gone well. I packed the buckled areas with Qcell and sanding resin. Roughed up the entire area I was laying the new glass on, cleaned everything well, and laminated 2 6oz patches from a few inches behind the logo all the way to the nose (staggered edges, cut in a wide angle V shape). After that, I sanded down the areas where I really messed up, cleaned, and added a hot coat. The hot coat finished with some bumps / air bubbles in it, which I now know was likely due to too much catalyst and bad brush technique. I also probably pulled a little too much resin out of the cloth when laminating, which could have caused the air bubbles. I'm doing this repair in my garage, so dust etc. is definitely going to prevent a perfect finish, which I'm 100% fine with as long as the repair is strong. 

Anyway, I was a little thin in some areas with the hot coat, and need to touch those areas up - do I only touch up the areas where the weave of the cloth is showing through? Or, do I sand everything down a bit more and hot coat the entire patch?

In the pics, you can see the bottom of the nose, which is the worst spot that I was too thin on the hot coat and absolutely need to touch up. I plan to sand down the high spots a bit more, vacuum out any dust from the weave, wipe it down really well, and touch it up. But, I also have some weird spots on the deck where I think I should sand down a bit more and touch up as well. I tried to get a good pic of one of these areas... you can see it when the light reflects off of it on areas I hadn't sanded much yet. Unfortunately, I found it really hard to get good pics of the issue. The good news is I think I actually did a pretty good job with most of it, and learned a ton. 

What would you do if you were me? Sand it all down and hot coat the whole thing again? Only touch up the bad areas?

If it helps, my goal with this isn't perfection - it's to learn and to make this board surfable again. 

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SammyA's picture
Joined: 01/14/2006

Looks like you have indents and low spots in the hotcoat. The shiny areas are the clue. For the next coat to stick you need to sand away any shiny spots. If not, you will find that resin will flake away when you sand the next coat. Shiny areas in a hot coat indicate the presence of wax, which will inhibit adhesion. Hot coats should only be applied to an even surface. Otherwise, you get this result.

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pth's picture
pth
Joined: 01/30/2011

Thanks. I sanded it all down and gave it another coat. Surprisingly it looked like only a few problem areas after sanding, which really smoothed everything out.

Do you think I pulled too much resin out of the cloth when laminating, or did a crappy job prepping?

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pth's picture
pth
Joined: 01/30/2011

Turned out perfectly, thank you.

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