I got a chunk of wood...

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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

I dont have a good speedy method for chambering, but the best way so far seems to be removing the bulk with multiple plunges of the forstner bit on my little drill press, then following up with the jig saw, and finally, the horse hoof rasp from mattwho.

It's a bit tedious. So I have 5 of the 10 chambers done on this piece, weight has gone from 8.5 to 6 lbs, will update when I finish.

I'm chambering pretty "aggressively", cuz I want to see a 50% drop in weight if I can.

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MrMik's picture
Joined: 07/17/2012

Great work, thanks for showing how you do it in good pictures!

I wonder if it would work to do a 'Honeycomb' approximation for the chambering, by marking hundreds of drill sites and then use the drill press only. No solid ribs, just holes, maybe with varying density or diameter depending on where more strength is needed in the board.

I imagine that would cause very even distribution of hull strength and might be easier overall.

No idea if the holes would have to go through all the way (difficult but not impossible to line up) or if random holes would work, with a few holes communicating between the 2 sides of the slice.

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wrcsixeight's picture
Joined: 07/18/2012
Do you stagger the chambers so the supports do not line up when glued back together?
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

I haven't gotten to that point yet, but that's the plan.

I plan to pack the holes with foam.

I had also considered glassing the holes inside then finishing the outside with varnish, has anyone done this before?

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wrcsixeight's picture
Joined: 07/18/2012

Foam is a good idea, so you do not have to worry about interconnecting the chambers for drainage or add a vent.

Also Cedar can split along the grain pretty easily with an impact in the center of a chamber.

I kept imagining a well placed knee puncturing the hollows on my recent build, and wound up adding a lot of reinforcement which helped push my desired end weight upwards.

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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Good point, so glass over everything probably best.

My skilsaw doesn't cut deep enough to make it in one pass, so I cut from the top & the bottom to get all the way thru.

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balsa's picture
Joined: 06/11/2004
That's the handle that Pete Casica uses on his modification kit for the Makita planer. For a good reason.
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McDing's picture
Joined: 05/22/2004
Yes glass it. Four ounce and ISO. Nice work Huck.
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That which can be assorted without evidence was read in an illegal magazine.

Monkstar1's picture
Joined: 06/21/2004
Okay, dumb question time. Why is foam a good idea? Isn't there still going to be air in the foam? Also, if you get a bad ding (foam or not) there's still going to be a need for drainage/repair and I would imagine the foam wouldn't make this any easier. Thanks.
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Send me your dinged, damaged, and yellowed.

BackyardBullard.com

Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Yes there is "air" even with foam, but the expansion and contracting of air is different with foam than with just air - my experience with HWS makes me leery of having so much air without venting. Not so with foam, I have a nine foot EPS longboard without venting, no problems.

I suppose we could discuss the density of the packing foam, but I feel pretty confident venting is not gonna be an issue. There are guys who chamber without venting, but I'm doing some pretty aggressive chambering, so I feel better adding foam.

Like Gene Cooper did on his master craftsman winning board. Sorry I can't access the embed code from my phone https://youtu.be/Y8UbkxMDwNA

Of course dings can be an issue, but I've got a strong wood shell, and with the foam inserts, the board is very strong, IMO. And water damage is always gonna be worse in a hollow board, based on my experience with HWS, where even a pinhole can be catastrophic.

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spuddups's picture
Joined: 04/14/2011
That's an ancient saw you've got there. I bet it's done a bit of work over the years!
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thrailkill's picture
Joined: 05/07/2004
When I shaped for Hobie, my racks were next to Terry Martin, he was using a worm drive Skil Saw, to cut his outlines. Quite a process to watch. A nearly finished outline, in a single pass. Just needed to fine tune the nose and tail.
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Bill Thrailkill SHAPER SINCE 1958
proneman's picture
Joined: 03/18/2004
Looking forward to pocket riding that beauty at Malibu!! Huck said I could give it a go!! Don't make it too lite Huck!! roger
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newschoolblue's picture
Joined: 06/30/2004
Pure awesomeness. I continue to get blown away every time I check on the status of this project. Take your time, Huck. I love your tagline (credit to Jim P.)
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Sejal Mathur's picture
Joined: 12/01/2017
I reside in Delhi, India. Day by day Delhi environment is getting worse. The pollution and deforestation are a major cause for spoiling Mother Earth. Keeping in mind the present situation of the city or country pollution, I can only say it can be tackled through using environment friendly things which don't harm our Mother Earth. We need to pay attention to use more natural things and make planet waste free as soon as possible.
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Sejal that's a sincere thought but the real source of those issues is way outside the scope of this thread

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McDing's picture
Joined: 05/22/2004
Well said amigo. Lowel
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That which can be assorted without evidence was read in an illegal magazine.

surfthis's picture
Joined: 03/18/2004
Looking good Huck! Looking forward to more shots.
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blah blah blah

Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

It's a less than precise process, the idea is to shoot for serious weight loss, but don't get too thin cuz there's still a little shaping and cleanup to be done.

A nearby sushi place throws these foam coolers out, thnx sharkcountry for the idea, gluing together with contact cement (water soluble), will glue in place with gorilla glue. Or maybe just stuff 'em in there and call it good.

Weight went from 8.5 lbs to 4.25, before foam inserts.

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GregTate's picture
Joined: 03/18/2004
Huck, looking really good. I'm surprised the weight loss is so big. all the best
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Personally I'm always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught. - Winston Churchill

Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Greg, I hope to lose a good 20 lbs. or more, but starting out at nearly 50 lbs. it's still probably gonna end up a bit on the "heavy" side.
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MrMik's picture
Joined: 07/17/2012
Could you use polyurethane expanding 'Space Invader' foam instead?
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Yes I think you could, don't see why not at any rate.
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Again, this is not precision work, just fitting everything reasonably tight. This is more like the pace of the fishbone hws I have built, slow and tedious, not like the fun pace of shaping with a chainsaw lol.
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red_boards's picture
Joined: 09/06/2007
If you were closer we could be routing out the sections with CNC. Thanks for the weight info. Dramatic weight reduction.
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Psychologically, I think this is harder than a fishbone hws. Cuz there you start out with nothing, and each step takes you closer to a real surfboard. Here, you shape a surfboard, then you deconstruct it, and for awhile each step takes you farther away from that complete surfboard you started with.

Eventually of course you reconstruct it, I can hardly wait.

Meanwhile I can lay the sections out, and imagine them forming a real surfboard again.

At this point I'm still playing around with different methods of chambering, that CNC sounds pretty good, haha, but it's all about doing the best I can with what I have.

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thrailkill's picture
Joined: 05/07/2004
Looking really good. I'd be real tempted to put a 1/16th or 1/8th Balsa or Basswood stringer in each cut, when you glue it back together. It would be visually very striking when finished.
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Bill Thrailkill SHAPER SINCE 1958
Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Bill I've been really thinking about that. I'm pretty sure I'll end up putting a center stringer in. Debating adding stringers also in the other cuts, or maybe just a black resin glue-line. Undecided.
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balsa's picture
Joined: 06/11/2004
"...or maybe just a black resin glue-line..." I was looking for this picture when you mentioned the black glue-line and it took me a few days to find it (old FU ad).
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Thnx balsa, that's the look. I went back a little further in history in my research...
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McDing's picture
Joined: 05/22/2004

No Diff on that one.

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That which can be assorted without evidence was read in an illegal magazine.

jrandy's picture
Joined: 09/04/2012
Looking awesome Huck! There was talk about one rail seeming heavier or denser than the other. Did you work that out during the chambering?
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http://pushheretosavealife.com/ Be safe, have fun. -J

Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Jrandy - turns out that despite the difference in grain color the weight difference is pretty small, so probably easily addressed, or maybe not worth worrying over after all.

But I haven't yet gotten to chambering the rail sections, those will be a little tricky. 

I haven't found a quick way of doing this, so I'm proceeding at a snail's pace, just posting when I take a break from the tedium of hollowing out section by section.

I put the corresponding sections next to each other, and scribed the differences, then sanded down the high spots so they matched. In this way cutting into sections will help keep little asymmetries from creeping in.

I'm gonna lighten this thing as much as I dare, but still thinking I'm gonna end up around 30 lbs. when completed.

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balsa's picture
Joined: 06/11/2004
"But I haven't yet gotten to chambering the rail sections, those will be a little tricky. I haven't found a quick way of doing this, so I'm proceeding at a snail's pace, just posting when I take a break from the tedium of hollowing out section by section." Suggestion (been there, done that):
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Thnx Guilhem, appreciate the tip. I roughed out a quick fin blank from a big scrap this morning before work.
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cmbacot's picture
Joined: 11/25/2009
Balso; Leave your personal life at home will ya?
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Entropy (noun; from the English); (1) a measure of a thermodynamic system's increasing disorder as it approaches equilibrium. (2) thermodynamic happy place. Usage; "Entropy abounds in my workshop".

wrcsixeight's picture
Joined: 07/18/2012
The rotary rasps for a dremel are a great tool. Just beware of the cheapo chinese versions. The 1/8 Inch shafts are actually wider and will not fit easily. I also found the dremel 90 degree attachment so useful, I pretty much never remove it, as I feel it gives way more control over the tool head.
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Stew_L's picture
Joined: 04/10/2016
I think contrasting stringers between each sectio would be great - you're not trying to hide the join but make a feature of it!
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Foiled the fin, the cedar feels pretty fragile, so probably require several layers of glass. After I foiled it, something about the shape was bugging me. So I made some aesthetic adjustments.
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Surfer O's picture
Joined: 06/05/2014
You are a beast Huck! So cool. I haven't been on swaylocks much recently and this is an amazing thread to return to. What a great build!
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Smerk's picture
Joined: 01/08/2017
Lovely bit of wood for a fin too. I like Bills idea of a stringer between each chamber and have always liked the contrast on some boat decks...
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Smerk, that looks awesome!

Looking through the old classic wood boards and longboards, there is precedent for both the contrasting stringer look, as seen in the first pic, and the more subtle 'just a glue-line' look, as seen on the Duke board.

I think 5 stringers would be a bit much, but I've always liked the 3 stringer look, so I'm thinking maybe a stringer in the middle and at the outside glue line, with just a simple glue line, or maybe a black resin glue line, at the inside joint.

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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
Some more pics from my day at the SHACC museum, if you get a chance, by all means check it out
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
.
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Smerk's picture
Joined: 01/08/2017
Wow, some history there. Thanks for posting.
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tblank's picture
Joined: 08/03/2009
Hi Huck. if it is weight that is the concern over aesthetics the Stringers could simply be inlays and save some lbs. there. Gotta qualify this by saying I've always been a triple stringer nut. Will you color the fin halos with pigment or go clear?
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009
The stringer weight is not a concern. No color on halo. Progress slow at this point. Thnx to all for the interest and support!
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Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Wow, some hella changes in my life & circumstances gonna disrupt this project.

Working like a mad dog in the evenings to try & get the chambering done at least, while i still have the setup for it.

Used some masonite and finish nailer to stabilize the rail pieces for chambering.

The one piece that's clamped down wants to bend like a big dog. That's the one that fought me on the cutting.

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McDing's picture
Joined: 05/22/2004
Excellent craftsmanship Huck. The fin is a beauty! Even nicer since you refoiled it and put the Bead/Halo on it. The clambering work is excellent, foam inserts etc. Much better than what I've seen done thru the years by others. I know that you've gotten comfortable with foam, but you're always up to a challenge. Lowel
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That which can be assorted without evidence was read in an illegal magazine.

Huck's picture
Joined: 12/07/2009

Wow - this thread (like the pieces of this board in my garage) has laid dormant for almost TWO YEARS!!

Took me awhile to even find this old thread.

But now I an finally getting back to this project.

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